1.Black Maple (Acer nigrum

(Acer nigrum)

Black Maple Leaf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Information:

  • This tree is 75-120 ft tall with a straight trunk commonly grows in forests, its leaves turn a yellow to orange red in the fall, native to the northern United States and southern parts of Canada such as Quebec,
  • It can be distinguished from its similar species the sugar maple by its 3 lobed leaves unlike the Sugar maples which is 5 lobed.

Characteristics:

  • Its leaf arrangement is opposite with a simple leaf complexity.
  • The leaves margins are lobed and grows horseshoe shaped samaras for its fruit.
  • Maples are our only trees with opposite leaf arrangement and lobed leaves.

Habitat:

  • Mature upland woods.

Fun fact:

  • Black maple is cut and sold with sugar maple as lumber, and they can also be tapped to get their sap for production of maple syrup.

Location:

  • Sharon Woods, Westerville OH.

Sources:

  1. srs.fs.usda.gov
  2. org/plants/result.php?id_plant=acni5
  3. A Field Guide to Trees and Shrubs (George A Petrides) Pages: 98 & 120

 

2.Scarlet Oak (Quercus coccinea -Muenchh.)

Information:

  • The Scarlet oak is known for its brilliant autumn color, it is known to be very fast-growing tree reaching heights up to 120 feet tall.
  • It is a part of the Red Oak group however this oak can be hairless or with tufts of hair in angles of veins.

Characteristics:

  • Has deeply lobed leaf margins and hairless twigs.
  • Alternate arrangement.
  • Simple leaf complexity.

Habitat:

  • Dry soils, grows in mid to southwestern United States forest.

Fun fact:

  • This tree can survive in various forest climates, such as temperate, Mediterranean, and tropical. Making it fairly resilient.

Sources:

  • A Field Guide to Trees and Shrubs (George A Petrides) Pages: 217 & 326.

 

3.Green Ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica)

Green Ash

 Characteristics:

  • The Green Ash has opposite leaf arrangement.
  • Pinnately leaf complexity.
  • The leaflets range 5-9 with hairless twigs.
  • This tree can between 50-75 feet tall.

Habitat:

  • Stream banks and flood plains.

Fun Fact:

  • Its flowers bloom from April to May, It grows wedge shaped fruits

Sources:

  • A Field Guide to Trees and Shrubs (George A Petrides) Pages: 50 & 60

 

4.Honey Locust (Gleditsia triacanthos L.)

Characteristics:

  • This trees’ leaf complexity is pinnately compounded.
  • The leaves are divided into numerous narrow leaflets and are slightly toothed
  • The leaf arrangement is opposite
  • You can find this species in central north America usually in. moist soil and near riverbeds.
  • The Water Locust is the only other one to have has such long thorns

Habitat:

  • Open mixed forests
  • Moist soil and near riverbeds

Fun fact:

  • The thorns of the honey locust have been known to be used by woodsman for pins, spearpoints, and animal traps.

 

5.Downy Juneberry (Amelanchier arborea– Michx f.)

Characteristics:

  • One of the taller juneberries,
  • Simple leaf complexity.
  • Alternate arrangement.
  • Its leaves can be fine toothed with a heart shaped base.

Habitat:

  • Found along borders of woodlands and stream banks, it can also be found in the hillside and in slopes of mountains.

Fun Fact:

  • It rarely lives longer than 50 years.

Sources:

  • org
  • A Field Guide to Trees and Shrubs (George A Petrides) Pages: 241 & 342

 

6.Eastern Black Cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.)  

Characteristics:

  • This tree grows between 70 to 110 feet tall.
  • Has a simple leaf complexity.
  • The Eastern Black Cherry has an Alternate leaf arrangement with serrated leaf margins.
  • The features that distinguish it from other black cherry species are its larger size more finely toothed leaves with a tuft of hair at the base of the midrib.
  • Grows dark red to purple black cherries.

Habitat: 

  • Ranges throughout open forests, edges, and savannas with adequate sunlight.

Fun fact:

  • One of the largest cherry tree species, the cherries are bitter and often used for jelly.
  • Songbirds and prairie chickens and white tail deer commonly consume the fruits.

Source:

  • A Field Guide to Trees and Shrubs (George A Petrides) Pages: 236

 

7.White Mulberry (Morus Alba L.)

Characteristics:

  • An Asiatic fast-growing tree that is similar to the Red Mulberry.
  • The leaves are hairless with red brown buds, and its fruit grow white in color.
  • The leaves are oval shaped with entire leaf margins.
  • It has simple complexity
  • It has alternate leaf arrangement

Habitat:

  • Rich soils

Fun fact:

  • Introduced by the British before the Revolution in an unsuccessful attempt to establish the silkworm industry.

Source:

  • A Field Guide to Trees and Shrubs (George A Petrides) Pages: 46

 

8.American Basswood (Tilia americana)

Characteristics:

  • The American Basswood has a simple leaf complexity and an alternate leaf arrangement with serrated leaf margins.
  • To separate this species from others is that its leaves are hairless unlike the Horay and White basswood which are hairy on the underside of the leaf.
  • It is a similar species to the chestnut tree.

Habitat:

  • Moist woods

Fun fact:

  • As a genus they are characterized by their heart-shaped leaves, the flowers are fragrant from June to August.

Sources:

  • A Field Guide to Trees and Shrubs (George A Petrides) Pages: 207 & 320

 

I took this course to learn more about plants, and trees, prior to taking this course I only knew what a maple or oak looked like because they are so common. During my time spent taking this course I have already learned so much more about plants. Identifying them by their leaf arragement or complexity and narrowing down what it could be. While at sharon woods I found  honey suckle, Ash, Oaks, Maples, and many more different trees, that prior to this course I would have next to no idea how to identify. I think this the same for the people the author was speaking about in  the article “Cure for Tree Blindness” . Trees, and Plants are all around us and they are fascinating. Its fun to stop and try to identify what is out in nature.