This week I had the opportunity to traverse the Olentangy River Trail and Tuttle Park in search of wildflowers, and some that were cultivated as well. Here is what I found…

Part 1 Flower Analysis

Flower #1
This flower was found at Tuttle Park in a flower bed.

It is on page 248 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name: Sweet William

Scientific name: P. maculata

Corolla: number of petals 5 that are separate

Calyx: number of sepals 5 that are fused

Androecium: number of stamens 7 arranged separately

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate (and # of carpels = 1 )

How can you tell?
To determine the gynoecium type I first saw that there was one carpel, then upon dissection and looking at the cross-section it was clear that there are just one chamber and one row of seeds.

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular)

Additional distinctive features: The petals have a pinkish-purple tie-dye look to them.

Flower #2
This flower was found at Tuttle Park in a flower bed.

It is on page 40 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name: Dwarf Snapdragon

Scientific name: Charnorrhinum minus

Corolla: number of petals 2 that are fused

Calyx: number of sepals 5 that are separate

Androecium: number of stamens 4 that are separate

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate (and # of carpels = 1 )

How can you tell?
There was one carpel, then upon dissection, and looking at the cross-section it was clear that there is just one chamber and one row of seeds.

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous

Flower symmetry: zygomorphic (irregular)

Additional distinctive features: Flowers had unique shapes due to fused petals.

Flower #3

This flower was found alongside the Olentangy River Trail

It is on page 220 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name: Wild Carrot

Scientific name: Daucus carota

Corolla: number of petals 5 that are separated

Calyx: number of sepals 10 that are separated

Androecium: number of stamens 5 that are separate

Gynoecium type: syncarpous (and # of carpels = 2 )

How can you tell?
There are two fused carpels, then after various attempts at obtaining a cross-section, I found it to have one vacuole that is divided into various sections each with its own seeds.

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular)

Additional distinctive features: There are many small white flowers that are bunched together.

Flower #4

This flower was found near the river bank on the Olentangy River Trail.

It is on page 200 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name: Pokeweed

Scientific name: Phytolacca americana

Corolla: number of petals 4 that are separate

Calyx: number of sepals 5 that are separate

Androecium: number of stamens is 10 that are separately arranged

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate (and # of carpels = 1 )
How can you tell?
There was only one stigma present, and cross-section showed just one vacuole filled with a row of seeds.
Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous
Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular)

Additional distinctive features: There are also three purple berries at the tip, each containing seeds.

Part #2

Flower #1

Common name: Wingstem

Scientific name: Actinomeris alternifolia

I found this flower near the Olentangy River Trail, close to the water on the riverbank. The flower has five yellow petals that extend out rather far, there are typically less than ten on each flower. There were many stigmas as well.

Flower #2

Common name: Mistflower

Scientific name: Eupatorium coelestinum

I found this flower on a side trail near the banks of the Olentangy River. It has many small blue-violet flowers that are bunched together. When I first saw this plant, I thought it was many berries bunched together, but after further examination, I saw all of the little flowers.

Flower #3

Common name: Day Lily

Scientific name: Hemerocallis fulva

This flower was found along the road next to an open field near my home in the Cleveland area. It has a unique funnel-shaped yellow flower and has three petals and three sepals.

Flower #4

Common name: Oxeye Daisy

Scientific name: Chrysanthemum leucanthemum

This flower was found along the road next to an open field near my home as well. It has the “typical” daisy look to it with the white petals, with the yellow cluster in the center. This flower had 20 petals, but it can typically range from between 15-30.