Final Botanical Survey


Cherry Plum (Prunus cerasifera): *

Red Oak (Quercus rubra): 6

Honey Locust (Gleditsia triacanthos): 4

Silver Maple (Acer saccharinum): 3

American Basswood (Tilia americana): 6

Tulip Tree (Liriodendron tulipifera): 6

Chinquapin Oak (Quercus muehlenbergii): 7

London Plane Tree (Platanus occidentalis): 7

River Birch (Betula nigra): 9

Eastern Redbud (Cercis canadensis): 3

Buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica): *

Amur Honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii): *

Annual Fleabane (Erigeron annuus): 0

Hoary Tick-trefoil (desmodium canescens ): 4

Poison Ivy (Toxicodendron radicans): 1

Black Locust (Robinia pseudoacacia): 0

White Mulberry (Morus albą):*

American Elm (Ulmus americana): 2

Common Yellow Wood-sorrel (Oxalis stricta):0

Wingstem (Verbesina alternifolia): 5

Box Elder (Acer negundo): 3

Pokeweed (Phytolacca americana): 1

Black Walnut (Jugulars nigra): 5

Zigzag Goldenrod (Solidago flexicaulis): 5

Pin Oak (Quercus palustris): 5

 

FQAI= sum( CC values for all species) / sqrt( total number of species)=82/5=16.4

 


4 High CC Plants!

River Birch (Betula nigra): 9

This tree has alternatively arranged single toothed leaves. It is native to the Atlantic coastal states, southern states, the lower Midwest, eastern Great Plains, and lower Mississippi River valley. It prefers moist to wet, rich, deep, acidic soils.

Chinquapin Oak (Quercus muehlenbergii): 7

..

London Plane Tree (Platanus occidentalis): 7

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Tulip Tree (Liriodendron tulipifera): 6

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4 Low CC Plants!

Black Locust (Robinia pseudoacacia): 0

This tree, which has often been given a bad name for it’s opportunistic rapid growth and robust thorns, is said to be native originally to the Appalachian Mountain range, though it has become naturalized throughout the United States, southern Canada, and even parts of Europe and Asia. The species is incredibly adaptive, growing in many elevations, microclimates, and soil types.

Annual Fleabane (Erigeron annuus): 0

Common Yellow Wood-sorrel (Oxalis stricta):0

Pokeweed (Phytolacca americana): 1


4 Invasive Species!

Common Buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica)

They have alternately arranged entire leaves, often appear as bushes. It is a species of small tree in the flowering plant family Rhamnaceae. It is native to Europe, northwest Africa and western Asia. It was introduced to North America as an ornamental shrub in the early 19th century or perhaps before, but it is now considered an invasive plant in several US states.

The seeds and leaves are mildly poisonous for humans and most other animals, but are readily eaten by birds, who disperse the seeds in their droppings. The toxins cause stomach cramps and laxative effects that may function in seed dispersal.

Amur Honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii)

Amur honeysuckle is a large, deciduous shrub with oppositely arranged entire leaves. It is native to temperate western Asia. Because of the invasive nature of this species, regardless of whether it is banned locally, it is imprudent to cultivate Amur honeysuckle in climates similar to those where the species has invaded, e.g. eastern North America.

English Ivy (hedera helix)

It is is a species of flowering plant of the ivy genus in the family Araliaceae, native to most of Europe and western Asia. I took this picture next to the Hitchcock hall on campus. They are rampant, clinging evergreen vine, climbing all over the ground and tree barks. Ivy berries are somewhat poisonous to humans, but ivy extracts are part of current cough medicines.

Narrow leaf cattail (Typha angustifolia)

It is a perennial herbaceous plant of genus Typha. The plant’s leaves are flat, very narrow. It has been proposed that the species was introduced from Europe to North America. . angustifolia can be distinguished from T. latifolia by its narrower leaves. Several parts of the plant are edible, including during various seasons the dormant sprouts on roots and bases of leaves, the inner core of the stalk, green bloom spikes, ripe pollen, and starchy roots.


4 Substrate Associated Plants!

Chinquapin Oak (Quercus muehlenbergii)

It has alternative lobed single leaves with round leaf base, and it is native to eastern and central North America. According to Forsyth, the distribution of them is generally limited to area with limy substrates.

Eastern Redbud (Cercis canadensis)

It has alternative single heat-shaped leaves. The twigs are slender and zigzag, dark red-purple-ish in color.  According to Forsyth, the distribution of them is generally limited to area with limy substrates.

Pin Oak (Quercus palustris)

Pin oak has broad, lobed leaves, with five or seven lobes, and each lobe has five to seven bristle-tipped teeth. According to Forsyth, the distribution of them is generally limited to area with high-lime, clay-rich substrates (developed in thick till plain).

Red Oak (Quercus rubra)

It has toothed alternative simple leaves. It is a native North America tree. Red oak is easy to recognize by its striped bark. According to Forsyth, the distribution of them is generally limited to area with high-lime, clay-rich substrates (developed in thick till plain.